Correlated Factors of Psychological Well-Being among High School Students

Main Article Content

Thineerat Thavorn
Sathaka Pimroon
Wareerat Thanoi

Abstract

          Purpose: To identify the psychological well-being and the relationship between personal factors: age, sex, GPA, sufficient income, satisfaction of income and psychological well-being of secondary school students.
         Design: Correlational study design.
         Methods: The 624 high school students were sampling from schools in Bangkok and Nakorn Pathom province, Thailand. The research instruments including personal information and 18-item Psychological Well-being Scale. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation.
         Main Findings: The high school students reported moderate level of psychological well-being (gif.latex?\bar{X} = 73.18, SD = 9.05). Autonomy revealed the lowest mean score (gif.latex?\bar{X} = 11.31, SD = 1.96) and personal growth revealed the highest mean score (gif.latex?\bar{X} = 13.73, SD = 2.34). Age, GPA, satisfaction of income, sufficient income were significantly correlated with psychological well-being at significance level of .05.
         Conclusion and recommendations: The findings of this study indicated that the psychological well-being of the secondary school students was in moderate level. Age, GPA, satisfaction with income, and sufficient income were correlated with psychological well-being. These findings could use as the basic knowledge to provide the mental health promotion for psychological well-being of adolescents in secondary school with the concern of their demographic factors. In addition, the
findings also provide the fundamental knowledge for further research to promote psychological well-being in adolescent.

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How to Cite
Thavorn, T., Pimroon, S., & Thanoi, W. (2018). Correlated Factors of Psychological Well-Being among High School Students. Nursing Science Journal of Thailand, 36(3), 59–70. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ns/article/view/146982
Section
Research Papers

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