Evaluation of Liver and Kidney Toxicity in Rats Receiving Proteoglycans from Fish Cartilage for the Acceleration of Burn Wound Healing

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Sitthiphon Bunman, MSc
Narongpon Dumavibhat, MD, PhD
Noppadol Larbcharoensub, MD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of proteoglycan extracted from fish cartilage for the acceleration of wound healing.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Second degree burn wounds were induced by an electrical hot plate measuring 2 cm in diameter and set at a temperature of 90 oC and placed on the back of rats for 10 seconds. Rats were randomly assigned to receive 1 gram of cream base (control group), 1% silver sulfadiazine (SSD), 1% proteoglycans (PG), 2% PG, a combination of 1% SSD + 1% PG, or a combination of 1% SSD + 2% PG applied to burn wounds to accelerate wound healing immediately after burning and once daily until day 27 post-burn. The toxicity of the rats’ liver and kidney functions were evaluated on day 7, 14, 21 and 28.

RESULTS: An evaluation of liver function tests showed on day 28 that the level of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase of rats treated with 1% SSD, 1% PG, 2% PG, combination of 1% SSD + 1% PG and combination of 1% SSD + 2% PG were not signifi cantly different when compared to the control group. An evaluation of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, on day 28 showed the level of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine of rats treated with 1% SSD, 1% PG, 2% PG, combination of 1% SSD + 1% PG and combination of 1% SSD + 2% PG were not signifi cantly different when compared to the control group.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that PG extracted from fish

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1.
Bunman S, Dumavibhat N, Larbcharoensub N. Evaluation of Liver and Kidney Toxicity in Rats Receiving Proteoglycans from Fish Cartilage for the Acceleration of Burn Wound Healing. BKK Med J [Internet]. 2016Feb.19 [cited 2020Jul.16];11(1):11. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bkkmedj/article/view/221407
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