Review of Central Venous Catheter-Related Infections and UV-C as a Potential Solution

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Aonnicha Burapachaisri
Chanond Sophonpanich
Aishwarya Raja
Charles Pan
Panisa Sundravorakul
Ratanaporn Bandasak

Abstract

Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable medical devices that are utilized in clinical settings globally. Though CVCs provide life-saving functions, they are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization that eventually leads to catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). Existing strategies in hospitals such as standard sterilization protocols have not been effective in significantly lowering the rate of CRBSIs in the past decade. The use of ultraviolet (UV) light as a source of microbial disinfectant is historically known. In particular, UV-C light has been shown to effectively eradicate bacteria, including strains that are difficult to kill with antibiotics. Many studies show that multiple logs-reduction in bacterial colonization after UV-C exposure can be achieved. With the emergence of light emitting diodes (LEDs) that deliver UV-C, the idea of applying UV-C energy to sterilize catheters has become more practical to implement due to their small size and low power consumption implement. In addition to its efficacy against bacteria, UV-C has also been shown to have little to no negative health effect on human tissues and minimal photochemical effect on infusates commonly delivered through CVCs. Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable medical devices that are utilized in clinical settings globally. Though CVCs provide life-saving functions, they are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization that eventually leads to catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). Existing strategies in hospitals such as standard sterilization protocols have not been effective in significantly lowering the rate of CRBSIs in the past decade. The use of ultraviolet (UV) light as a source of microbial disinfectant is historically known. In particular, UV-C light has been shown to effectively eradicate bacteria, including strains that are difficult to kill with antibiotics. Many studies show that multiple logs-reduction in bacterial colonization after UV-C exposure can be achieved. With the emergence of light emitting diodes (LEDs) that deliver UV-C, the idea of applying UV-C energy to sterilize catheters has become more practical to implement due to their small size and low power consumption implement. In addition to its efficacy against bacteria, UV-C has also been shown to have little to no negative health effect on human tissues and minimal photochemical effect on infusates commonly delivered through CVCs. Altogether, UV-C light has a promising application in the prevention of CRBSIs that is not only effective but safe., UV-C light has a promising application in the prevention of CRBSIs that is not only effective but safe.

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1.
Burapachaisri A, Sophonpanich C, Raja A, Pan C, Sundravorakul P, Bandasak R. Review of Central Venous Catheter-Related Infections and UV-C as a Potential Solution. BKK Med J [Internet]. 2017Feb.20 [cited 2020Jul.15];13(1):99. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bkkmedj/article/view/221812
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