Can Automated Breast Volume Scanning be an Alternative Tool toHandheld Ultrasonography for Breast Cancer Screening?

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Rattawach Ariyaratrangsee, MD
Worachart Saksirinukul, MD
Thanyalak Ninpiethoon, MD
Kong Jaroenrad, MD
Phatarachate Klaiklern, MD
Umpawan Waenon
Surin Kwanon
Wannisa Suwannarat
Boontawee Alipariyakul

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To assess diagnostic value of automated breast volume scanning(ABVS) versus handheld ultrasonography (HHUS) in breast cancer screening.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: All 110 participants received an ABVS examinationcompared with HHUS which was set up as a standard tool. The scans were interpretedby specialists blinded to the results of breast imaging and medical history. CohenKappa value was used to interpret agreement between diagnostic tools.

RESULTS: On the basis of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)classification, of the 110 cases, an agreement was achieved in 102 cases (92.7%).Kappa value (K) was 0.885 representing almost perfect agreement.

CONCLUSION: We concluded that ABVS is comparable to HHUS as an adjunctivetool to mammography for screening of breast cancer

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1.
Ariyaratrangsee R, Saksirinukul W, Ninpiethoon T, Jaroenrad K, Klaiklern P, Waenon U, Kwanon S, Suwannarat W, Alipariyakul B. Can Automated Breast Volume Scanning be an Alternative Tool toHandheld Ultrasonography for Breast Cancer Screening?. BKK Med J [Internet]. 2017Sep.20 [cited 2021Sep.27];13(2):27. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bkkmedj/article/view/221906
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