A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics With or Without Additional Post-op Antibiotics Administration in Cesarean Section Patients for Prevention of Post-op Infection in a Private Hospital

Main Article Content

Natchaya Boonplod
Panitphim Yeunsak

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics with or without additional post-op antibiotics on infectious complications in women undergoing cesarean section.


MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart review of cesarean section patients at Bangkok Hospital Chiang Mai between 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018 was carried out. Women at 37-42 weeks’ gestational age who underwent cesarean section and received prophylactic antibiotics with or without additional post-op antibiotic administration were reviewed. They were divided into 2 groups: those who received post-delivery antibiotic vs those who did not. To compare post cesarean delivery infection rate from the delivery day until 6 weeks after. The primary end point is post cesarean section infection from delivery to 6 weeks’ post-operative


RESULTS: 481 women received prophylactic antibiotic prior to delivery by cesarean section. 46 were excluded 32 due to being less than 37 weeks’ gestational age, 3 received antibiotics a week prior to delivery, 11 with history of allergic reaction to penicillin or cephalosporin. So, only 435 women met these research study criteria. Within these, 170 cases (39.1%) received additional antibiotics after cesarean delivery, 265 cases (60.9%) didn’t receive antibiotics after cesarean delivery. 20% of prophylactic antibiotic patients only spent more than 60 minutes in the operation room, while 55.29% of those with additional antibiotic post-op did so. 4 (2.4%) cases of additional antibiotic post-op group had post-delivery infection. While 2 (0.8%) cases of patient without additional post-op antibiotic developed infection.


CONCLUSION: Additional post-op antibiotics didn’t decrease the incidence of post-delivery infections.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Boonplod N, Yeunsak P. A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics With or Without Additional Post-op Antibiotics Administration in Cesarean Section Patients for Prevention of Post-op Infection in a Private Hospital. BKK Med J [Internet]. 2023 Feb. 28 [cited 2024 Apr. 23];19(1):39. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bkkmedj/article/view/258951
Section
Original Article

References

World Health Organization. WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of maternal peripartum Infections. Geneva: WHO Press; 2015. ISBN 978 92 4 154936 3.

Maharaj D. Postpartum pyrexia: a review. Part I. Obstet Gynecol Surv 2007;62(6):393-9. doi: 10.1097/01. ogx.0000265998.40912.5e.

Bailit JL, Grobman WA, Rice MM, et al. Evaluation of delivery options for second-stage events. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2016;214(5): 638.e1-638.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2015.11.007.

Liabsuetrakul T, Lumbiganon P, Chongsuvivatwong V. Prophylactic antibiotic prescription for cesarean section. Int J Qual Health Care 2002;14(6):503-8. doi: 10.1093/intqhc/14.6.503.

Valent AM, DeArmond C, Houston JM, et al. Effect of post–cesarean delivery oral cephalexin and metronidazole on surgical site infection among obese women: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2017;318(11):1026-34. doi:10.1001/ jama.2017.10567

Bernard R. Fundamentals of Biostatistics. 5th ed. California: Duxbery; 2000:308.

Fleiss JL, Levin B, Paik MC. Statistical methods for rates and proportions. 3rd ed. John Wiley&Sons; 2003:76.

Ngamjarus C, Chongsuvivatwong V. n4Studies: Sample size and power calculations for android. The Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Program: The Thailand Research Fund & Prince of Songkla University; 2014.

Wannaro P, Liabsuetrakul T. Risk factors for post cesarean infectious morbidity after single dose ampicillin or cefazolin prophylaxis. Songkla Med J 2002;20(4):293-300