Relationships among Personal Factors, Perception about Safety Methods in Medication Administration and Safe Medication Practices of Nursing Students at a Faculty of Nursing in Bangkok Metropolis

Main Article Content

Chongjit Saneha
Jongkonwan Musikthong
Sarinrut Sripasong
Thanitha Samai

Abstract

          Purposes: To study the relationships among personal factors, perception about safety methods in medication administration and safe medication practices of nursing students.
          Design: Descriptive correlational study.
          Methods: A sample of 420 nursing students who had medication administration experience at least 5 times was recruited from a Faculty of Nursing in Bangkok Metropolis. Data were collected using three questionnaires: Personal Information Form, Safe Medication Practices, and Perception about Safety Methods in Medication Administration, respectively. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson product moment correlation.
          Main findings: Mean age of 420 nursing students was 21.62 years old (SD = 1.15). The results showed that 97.4 % of nursing students perceived the importance of safety methods in medication administration at a high and very high levels; and 73.6% of them practiced in safe medication administration at a very low risk level. Perception about safety methods in medication administration (r = .464), self-preparation (r = .358), awareness of patient safety (r = .302), self-training (r = .238), perception of self-importance (r = .181), and age (r = .153) were positively related to safe medication practices at a statistical significance level .05.
          Conclusion and recommendations: Perception about safety methods in medication
administration, self-preparation, awareness of patient safety, self-training and perception of
self-importance are important factors for safe medication practices of nursing students. Nurse
instructors should monitor students’ perceptions about safety methods in medication
administration, encourage them to perform self-preparation for knowledge and self-training for
increasing their knowledge, experiences, and skills in safe medication practices. Moreover, they
need to stress on students’ awareness about patient safety and also how important the nursing
students are in the process of safety medication administration to improve the safe medication
practices and minimize the risk of medication error.

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How to Cite
Saneha, C., Musikthong, J., Sripasong, S., & Samai, T. (2018). Relationships among Personal Factors, Perception about Safety Methods in Medication Administration and Safe Medication Practices of Nursing Students at a Faculty of Nursing in Bangkok Metropolis. Nursing Science Journal of Thailand, 36(1), 17–30. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ns/article/view/145276
Section
Research Papers

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