Factors Predicting Self-Management Behavior among Patients with Uncontrolled Essential Hypertension

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Panida Jandeekaewsakul
Nantiya Watthayu
Nantawan Suwonnaroop

Abstract

          Purpose: To study self-management behavior and predictive power of age, gender, education level, health literacy, social support, and patient-provider communication on self-management behavior among patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension.
          Design: Correlational predictive study.
          Methods: The sample consisted of 84 patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension whose blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg or higher. The subjects were recruited from 3 public health centers, under Bangkok Health Department, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration. A convenience sampling was used to recruit 84 subjects. Data were collected using questionnaires including personal data and treatment, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Health Literacy assessment Scale, Patient-provider Communication Questionnaire, and Self-management Behavior Questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaires were .88, .81, .84, and .90, respectively. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regressions with stepwise method.


          Main findings: Self-management behavior of patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension was at a low level (gif.latex?\bar{X} = 2.00, SD = 1.09). Social support was the single best predictor (step 1), 15.10% of the variance was accounted and health literacy was the next best predictor, after social support was included in the model (step 2). Health literacy accounted for an additional 8.1% (R2 change = .081) of the variability. Altogether, they could explain 23.20% of variability in self-management (R2 = .232, F = 12.259, p < .001). Social support was the most important predictor of self-management behavior among patients with hypertension (β = .368, p < .001), followed by health literacy (β = .285, p = .005)


          Conclusion and recommendations: The study finding could be used as a guideline for
healthcare providers, in particular to nurses, for developing a self-management behavioral program for patients with hypertension by enhancing social support and promoting health literacy to practice self-management behavior effectively.

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How to Cite
Jandeekaewsakul, P., Watthayu, N., & Suwonnaroop, N. (2018). Factors Predicting Self-Management Behavior among Patients with Uncontrolled Essential Hypertension. Nursing Science Journal of Thailand, 36(1), 31–43. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ns/article/view/145412
Section
Research Papers

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