Factors correlated with Depression among Adolescents in Foster Homes

Main Article Content

Prayoonsri Srijan
Phuangphet Kaesornsamut
Wareerat Thanoi

Abstract

          Purpose: To examine the prevalence of depression and the relationships of intelligence quotient, history of being abused, self-esteem and social support with depression among adolescents in foster homes.


          Design: Descriptive correlational study.


          Methods: The sample consisted of 100 adolescents with 10-19 years of age retrieved from 4 foster homes. Data were collected by using 4 instruments: the demographic questionnaire, the Children’s Depression Inventory, the revised version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and a revised Thai Multi-dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Descriptive statistics, Pearson’s product moment correlation, point bi-serial correlation, and t-test were used for data analysis.


          Main findings: The findings revealed that the prevalence of depression in this sample was 48 percent. History of being abused was significantly and positively correlated with depression at a moderate level (r = .409, p < .01). Additionally, self-esteem and social-support were negatively correlated with depression at a moderate level and at a low level (r = - .639, p < .01; r = - .313, p < .01, respectively). However, intelligence quotient was not correlated with depression in adolescents in foster homes.


          Conclusion and recommendations: History of being abused, self-esteem and social support were significantly correlated with depression in adolescents in foster homes. Screening for depression among adolescents in foster homes is highly recommended, especially in adolescents with a history of being abused. Mental health promotion program should be emphasized on self-esteem and social support in order to enhance psychological well-being and reduce a prevalence rate of major depressive disorder among adolescents in foster homes.

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How to Cite
Srijan, P., Kaesornsamut, P., & Thanoi, W. (2020). Factors correlated with Depression among Adolescents in Foster Homes. Nursing Science Journal of Thailand, 38(1), 86-98. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ns/article/view/237414
Section
Research Papers

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