Fasciola gigantica: worm recovery rate and adult maturity in experimental host, dwarf hamster infection

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Anawat Phalee
Chalobol Wongsawad

Abstract

 The present study was conducted to observe the worm recovery rate and adult maturity of Fasciola gigantica, which is plant-borne trematode of ruminants and humans. Adult worms that infect the liver of a host are mainly a causative agent of hepatic damage, which can have a serious impact on the health of the host. Sixteen dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) were used in this study as the experimental host. Thirty experimental encysted metacercariae were force fed to each mouse and were then sacrificed every 3 days post-infection (PI). Adult worms were observed in the intestine and liver, and then worm recovery and adult maturity were investigated. The  The present study was conducted to observe the worm recovery rate and adult maturity of Fasciola gigantica, which is plant-borne trematode of ruminants and humans. Adult worms that infect the liver of a host are mainly a causative agent of hepatic damage, which can have a serious impact on the health of the host. Sixteen dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) were used in this study as the experimental host. Thirty experimental encysted metacercariae were force fed to each mouse and were then sacrificed every 3 days post-infection (PI). Adult worms were observed in the intestine and liver, and then worm recovery and adult maturity were investigated. The  results showed that metacercariae were excysted to young adult worms and were recovered in the intestine on days 3 and 6 PI, and until day 9 PI when they were found in the liver of the hosts. Incidence of parasitic infestation was found to be 100% and the average worm recovery rate was 36.00%. The worm recovery rate continuously decreased until day 45 PI. The highest and lowest worm recovery rates were 53.33% on days 3 and 9 PI, and 13.33% on day 45 PI, respectively. In an investigation of the development of the F. gigantica it was found that in accordance with the size of the body, the size of the oral and ventral suckers were also proportionally increased. The specific sizes of body were 0.24 x 0.42 mm. (day 3 PI) and 3.80 x 13.90 mm. (day 45 PI). Additionally,  genital pores were discovered on day 9 PI, and caeca were found on day 18 PI, while, testes and ovary were discovered on day 27 PI and developed maturely on day 39 PI. Immature eggs were discovered on day 42 PI, which indicated that this was the point that the parasites began to mature. However, the dwarf hamsters died on day 45 PI. Therefore, it can be confirmed that F. gigantica metacercariae that were derived from experimental encystment could infect and develop within dwarf hamsters. This result can be applied for the treatment, monitoring, management and control program of this parasite and then be applied in other experimental hosts.

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Phalee, A., & Wongsawad, C. (2014). Fasciola gigantica: worm recovery rate and adult maturity in experimental host, dwarf hamster infection. Veterinary Integrative Sciences, 12(1), 31–39. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/vis/article/view/146673
Section
Research Articles

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