A Novel “Inocap” Method for Homogeneous Catheter Hubs Bacterial Inoculation Using a Combination of Male Luer Caps and O-rings.

Main Article Content

William W. Tang
Benyarat Wiriyanithinon
Nathan S. Kim
Chanond Sophonpanich
Tanant Waritanant

Abstract

Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) pose significant health risks and financial consequences for healthcare systems worldwide. In order to develop novel antiseptic technologies as alternative prophylactics for CRBSIs, a consistent and reproducible bacterial inoculation method is required for testing the technologies’ antiseptic effects. This study developed and investigated a new “Inocap” model for standardized bacteria inoculation on to surfaces of catheter hubs that is exposed and highly susceptible to contamination in healthcare settings. The results showed a significantly smaller variance in the number of bacteria inoculated onto the catheter hubs by the new Inocap method than the traditional dip method (p ≈ 0.02) while producing no significant difference in the mean value (p > 0.25), indicating that this new Inocap method could work as a more precise inoculation model for future disinfection studies.

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How to Cite
1.
Tang WW, Wiriyanithinon B, Kim NS, Sophonpanich C, Waritanant T. A Novel “Inocap” Method for Homogeneous Catheter Hubs Bacterial Inoculation Using a Combination of Male Luer Caps and O-rings. BKK Med J [Internet]. 2018Sep.20 [cited 2020Jul.15];14(2):28. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bkkmedj/article/view/222528
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Original Article

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