The Influences of Depression, Identity of Symptoms, Smoking Status, and Number of Daily Drug Doses on Adherence to Inhaled Long-Acting Bronchodilators in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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Thonaput Sumonviwat
Doungrut Wattanakitkrileart
Kanaungnit Pongthavornkamol
Nuttapol Rittayamai

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to examine the influences of depression, identity of symptoms, smoking status, and number of daily drug doses on adherence to inhaled long-acting bronchodilators in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).


Design: Predictive correlational study design.


Methods: The study samples included 173 patients with COPD who came for follow-up visits at COPD clinic of a tertiary hospital in Bangkok. Data were collected by questionnaires including demographic data questionnaire, Medication Adherence Report Scale, the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (identity item), and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis.


Main findings: The results showed that majority (93.6%) were male with average age of 73.32 years (SD = 9.27). Seventy-four percent of the participants were adherent to inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, while depression, identity of symptoms, smoking status, and number of daily drug doses together contributed for 15.1% of variation on adherence to inhaled long-acting bronchodilators in patients with COPD. It was also found that only depression could predict inhaled therapy adherence in patients with COPD (OR = .91; 95%CI = .86, .95, p < .001).


Conclusion and recommendations: The influences of depression associated with non-adherence to inhaled long-acting bronchodilators in patients with COPD. Hence, nurses should pay attention to assess, prevent and manage depression in patients with COPD in order to promote medication adherence in patients with COPD.

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Sumonviwat, T., Wattanakitkrileart, D., Pongthavornkamol, K., & Rittayamai, N. (2019). The Influences of Depression, Identity of Symptoms, Smoking Status, and Number of Daily Drug Doses on Adherence to Inhaled Long-Acting Bronchodilators in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Nursing Science Journal of Thailand, 37(1), 45-58. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ns/article/view/183623
Section
Research Papers

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