A Qualitative Study of Factors Facilitating the Engagement of Sundanese Women in Cervical Screening

Main Article Content

Ida Maryati
Praneed Songwathana
Umaporn Boonyasopun

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to explore facilitators of Sundanese women to engage in cervical cancer screening. Methods: A qualitative study was used and data were collected through in-depth interviews. Fifteen Sundanese women at risk groups were recruited from several health clinics. Data were analyzed using four stages from Leininger’s method. Results: Findings revealed that factors facilitating Sundanese women to engage in cervical screening were 1) encouragement from a community health volunteer and a health care provider, 2) experienced of vaginal discharges (keputihan), 3) being at-risk of cancer group, 4) Muslim’s belief about obligations in making efforts (ikhtiar) to maintain their health, 5) friendly health care services 6) having health insurance. Discussion: It is recommended that strengthening the role of community health volunteers and health care providers on cervical screening in health services is needed. In addition, considerations of Sundanese women’s beliefs and their social networks towards cervical screening program are important to increase their engagement in cervical screening.

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How to Cite
Maryati, I., Songwathana, P., & Boonyasopun, U. (2021). A Qualitative Study of Factors Facilitating the Engagement of Sundanese Women in Cervical Screening. Songklanagarind Journal of Nursing, 41(2), 37-46. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/nur-psu/article/view/251644
Section
Research Articles

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