Relationship between Health Literacy and Preventive Behavior Regarding PM 2.5 Exposure among Pregnant Women, Pathum Thani Hospital

Main Article Content

Suphangphim Rattasumpun
Nithinan Sirabarameesith
Chaninthorn Rattasumpun

Abstract

Objective: This correlation descriptive research aimed to investigate the relationship between health literacy and preventive behavior regarding PM 2.5 exposure among pregnant women. Method: The purposive sample included 425 normal pregnant women, aged 20 years or more, who had attended the antenatal clinic at Pathum Thani Hospital, Pathum Thani Province, between May 2021 to April 2022. The research instruments comprised demographic data form, a health literacy questionnaire developed by the researcher using the framework by Nutbeam, and Preventive Behavior Regarding PM 2.5 Exposure Questionnaire of pregnant women. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that the health literacy and preventive behavior of the samples were at a moderate level (M = 3.59, S.D = .57 and M = 3.82, SD = .59, respectively) and health literacy had a positive statistically significant correlation with preventive behavior at a high level (r = .784, p < .001). The results also demonstrated that health literacy is associated with preventive behavior. Thus, the nurse should provide health promotion activities that focus on promoting health literacy to modify health behavior that increases the preventive behavior regarding PM 2.5 exposure among pregnant women.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Rattasumpun, S. ., Sirabarameesith, N. ., & Rattasumpun, C. . (2022). Relationship between Health Literacy and Preventive Behavior Regarding PM 2.5 Exposure among Pregnant Women, Pathum Thani Hospital. Journal of Research in Nursing-Midwifery and Health Sciences, 42(3), 53–62. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/nur-psu/article/view/257743
Section
Research Articles

References

World Health Organization. Ambient (outdoor) air pollution [Internet]. 2021 [cited 2021 Sep 22]. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ambient-(outdoor)-air-quality-and-health

Department of Disease Control Committee. Medical and public health operations manual: PM2.5 in 2020 [Internet]. Nonthaburi: Ministry of Public Health; 2021 [cited 2022 Apr 2]. Available form: http://envocc.ddc.moph.go.th/uploads/downloads/do_manual_PM2.5.pdf. Thai.

Gonzalez-Casanova I, Stein AD, Barraza-Villarreal A, et al. Prenatal exposure to environmental pollutants and child development trajectories through 7 years. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2018; 221(4): 616-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.04.004.

World Health Organization. Burden of disease from ambient air pollution for 2012 (Summary of results) [Internet]; 2014 [cited 2020 Dec 8]. Available from: http://www.who.int/gho/phe/outdoor_air_pollution/burden_text/en/

Tapia VL, Vasquez BV, Vu B, et al. Association between maternal exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5) and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Lima, Peru. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2020; 30(4): 689-97. doi: 10.1038/s41370-020-0223-5.

Yu H, Zhang J, Zhou R. The impact of particulate matter 2.5 on the risk of preeclampsia: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Environ Sci Pollut Res. 2020; 27(30): 37527-39. doi: 10.1007/s11356-020-10112-8.

Li J, Huang L, Kuijp TJ, et al. Exposure and perception of PM2.5 pollution on the mental stress of pregnant women. Environ Int. 2021; 156: 1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2021.106686.

Liu Y, Xu J, Chen D, et al. The association between air pollution and preterm birth and low birth weight in Guangdong, China. BMC Public Health. 2019; 19(3): 1-10. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-6307-7.

Wojtyla C, Zielinska K, Wojtyla-Buciora P, et al. Prenatal fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure and pregnancy outcomes-analysis of term pregnancies in Poland. Int J Environ Res. Public Health. 2020; 17(6): 1-10. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17165820.

Zhang X, Fan C, Ren Z, et al. Maternal PM2.5 exposure triggers preterm birth: A cross-sectional study in Wuhan, China. Glob Health Res Policy. 2020; 5: 17. doi: 10.1186/s41256-020-00144-5.

Percy Z, DeFranco E, Xu F, et al. Trimester specific PM2.5 exposure and fetal growth in Ohio, 2007-2010. Environ Res. 2019; 171(4): 111-8. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2019.01.031.

Dastoorpoor M, Khanjani N, Moradgholi A, et al. Prenatal exposure to ambient air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Ahvaz, Iran: A generalized additive model. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2021; 94(2): 309-24. doi: 10.1007/s00420-020-01577-8.

Zhang B, Liang S, Zhao J, et al. Maternal exposure to air pollutant PM2.5 and PM10 during pregnancy and risk of congenital heart defects. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2016; 26(4): 422-7.

Shang L, Huang L, Yang W, et al. Maternal exposure to PM2.5 may increase the risk of congenital hypothyroidism in the offspring: A national database based study in China. BMC Public Health. 2019; 19(1): 1412. doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-7790-1.

Oudina A, Frondeliusa K, Haglundc N, et al. Prenatal exposure to air pollution as a potential risk factor for autism and ADHD. Environ Int. 2019; 133(Pt A): 105149. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.105149.

Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health. Manual for surveillance, prevention, and control of diseases and health threats caused by PM 2.5. Bangkok: Aksorn Graphic and Design Publishing House; 2021. Thai.

Annual Report of Antenatal Clinic, Pathum Thani: Pathum Thani Hospital; 2020-2021. Thai.

Office of the National Economic and Social Development Council. National Health Development Plan No. 13 (2023-2027) [Internet]. Nonthaburi: Office of the National Economic and Social Development Council; 2022 [cited 2022 Apr 4]. Available from: https://www.nesdc.go.th/download/document/Yearend/2021/plan13.pdf. Thai.

Supornpraditchai T. Demographic characteristics, individual self-protective behavior and health self-assessment among the people in areas with high PM 2.5 concentrationin Bangkok. NBU. 2021; 10(2): 107-24. Thai.

Chumkesornkulkit P, Chaiyaparn N, Boonkla S, et al. Health literacy and disease and hazard prevention behaviors of Thai people. J Hlth Sci Res. 2021; 15(3): 25-36. Thai.

Panahi R, Yekefallah L, Shafaei M, et al. Effect of health literacy among students on the adoption of osteoporosispreventive behaviors in Iran. J Educ Health Promot. 2020; 28(9): 191. doi: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_400_19.eCollection2020.

Nutbeam D. Health literacy as a public health goal: A challenge for contemporary health education and communication strategies into health 21st century. Health Promot Int. 2000; 15(3): 259-67. doi: 10.1093/heapro/15.3.259.

Nawabi F, Krebs F, Vennedey V, et al. Health literacy in pregnant women: A systematic review. Int J Environ Res. Public Health. 2021; 18(7): 3847. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18073847.

Friis K, Vind BD, Simmons RK, et al. The relationship between health literacy and health behavior in people with diabetes: A Danish population-based study. J Diabetes Res. 2016; 2016: 1-7. doi: 10.1155/2016/7823130.

Intarakamhang U. Creating the situations report of environmental health literacy on preventing the health impacts from dust particulate matter of less than 2.5n micrometers (PM2.5) of village health volunteers in ecological industrial urban areas [Internet]. Nonthaburi: Health Impact Assessment Division, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health; 2020 [cited 2020 Apr 4]. Available from: http://bsris.swu.ac.th/upload/319381.pdf. Thai.

Shigemi D, Tabuchi T, Okawa S, et al. Association between health literacy and COVID-19 prevention behaviors among pregnant and postpartum women. J. Matern.-Fetal Neonatal Med. 2022; 1: 1-7 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2022.2081498.

Yamane T. Statistics: An introductory analysis. 2nd ed. New York: Harper and Row; 1967.

Fleary SA, Joseph P, Pappagianopoulos JE. Adolescent health literacy and health behavior: A systematic review. J Adolesc. 2018; 116-27. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.11.010.