Relationship between Knowledge, Perceived Self-efficacy in Basic Life Support (BLS) and Chest Compression Performance among Undergraduate Nursing Students

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Suphamas Partiprajak

Abstract

          The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate knowledge of basic life support (BLS), perceived self-efficacy in BLS and chest compression performance as a guideline proposed by American Heart Association (AHA) in the year 2010 after attending the BLS course; and to (2) explore the relationship between knowledge, self-efficacy and percent correct of chest compression among nursing students. The sample consisted of 100 fourth year undergraduate nursing students from Ramathibodi School of Nursing. Data were collected by using questionnaires. Participants were asked to perform chest compression on a Resusci Anne manikin. Chest compression performance was evaluated using data printout from a skill reporter device. Descriptive statistics and Spearman Rank correlation were used for data analysis.

          The results revealed that almost all of the participants (95%) passed the written test for knowledge of BLS. Almost all of them (98%) perceived their self-efficacy in BLS at good to excellent level. Chest compression performance was suboptimal compared to the guideline recommendation by the AHA. Fourteen percent of the participants performed too shallow chest compression (< 50 mm). Ninety percent of them performed too fast (> 120 times per minute). There was a significant correlation between knowledge of BLS and the correct percentage of chest compression (rs = 0.296, p = 0.001). No significant correlation between knowledge and self-efficacy of BLS (rs = 0.088, p = 0.193). No significant correlation between self-efficacy of BLS and correct percentage of chest compression (rs = 0.134, p = 0.093).

          Therefore, in BLS training, emphasis should be placed on knowledge improvement and then on better quality of chest compression. BLS trainers should focus on chest compression technique so that the trainee can achieve the adequate depth and rate of chest compression.

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How to Cite
Partiprajak, S. (2015). Relationship between Knowledge, Perceived Self-efficacy in Basic Life Support (BLS) and Chest Compression Performance among Undergraduate Nursing Students. Songklanagarind Journal of Nursing, 35(1), 119–134. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/nur-psu/article/view/33102
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Original Articles