Pandemic of Covid 19 and myopic progression in children

Main Article Content

Worapot Srimanan

Abstract

Myopia is a condition in which the radiating light from objects focuses on the front plane of the retina. This condition leads to a poor visual perception that could affect the quality of life, such as headaches, eye strain, and squinting. Visual symptoms could affect the quality of life by decreasing work performance or learning capability. Numerous sequelae are associated with myopic eye and correlate with long-term visual disabilities, especially in high myopia, such as vitreous degeneration, retinal tear, retinal detachment, myopic macular degeneration, cataract, and open-angle glaucoma. Nowadays, myopia is a global concern and a major socioeconomic problem. The prevalence is rising, especially in Asian descent, compared with Europe and American descent. Multifactorial factors lead to myopia, including genetic factors, prolonged near work, and decreased outdoor time. Since the outbreak of covid-19, lifestyle change includes social distancing, online learning platforms, and working from home. They lead to myopia occurrence and myopia progression. Awareness about the occurrence and progression of myopia in the covid era may lead to better patient care and proper health promotion.

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บทความฟื้นวิชา (Subject Review)

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