Effect of Guava Leaf Extract Spray on Halitosis after Garlic Ingestion

Authors

  • O Pongpitchayadej Institute of Dentistry, Department of Medical Services
  • R Kessuwanrak Institute of Dentistry, Department of Medical Services

Keywords:

Guava leaf extract, Halitosis, Garlic, Oral ChromaTM

Abstract

This research aimed to investigate efficiency of guava leaf extract commercial spray on halitosis after garlic ingestion. Sixty subjects (11 male, 49 female, aged 20-37 years) with no systemic diseases, no smoking and alcohol, no removable denture, no fixed orthodontic appliances and no periodontal pocket > 5 mm were selected. The concentration levels of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide before garlic ingestion were measured (Tb) by OralChromaTM. After that, the subjects were separated into two groups; one used guava leaf extract spray and the other the NSS spray. Subjects were then given Nam-Neaung and 5g. of chopped garlic wrapped with dough sheet with sauce. Chewing continued for 1 minute followed by drinking water (200ml.). Halitosis self assessment was performed before and after garlic ingestion. Hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide were measured (T1); subjects were sprayed using either the guava leaf or NSS spray. The levels of the three gases were measured (T2) again. To compare the concentration level of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide before-after using the guava leaf extract spray, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test was analyzed. To compare the concentration levels of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide between guava leaf extract spray and NSS spray, Mann-Whitney U test was analyzed at 0.05 significance level. The result show that concentration level of dimethyl sulfide was significantly reduced (p=0.000), but that of hydrogen sulfide were not significantly reduced. In contrast, the level of methyl mercaptan was significantly increased after using guava leaf extract spray (p =0.029). Comparing between using the guava leaf extract spray and NSS spray, there were not significant differences in reducing the concentration level of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide (Mann-Whitney U prob = 0.333, 0.780 and 0.690). In conclusion, Guava leaf extract spray efficiently reduced hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide after garlic ingestion. However without significant difference when compared with the use of the NSS spray.

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Published

30-12-2019

How to Cite

1.
Pongpitchayadej O, Kessuwanrak R. Effect of Guava Leaf Extract Spray on Halitosis after Garlic Ingestion. j dept med ser [Internet]. 2019 Dec. 30 [cited 2022 Sep. 25];44(6):92-8. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JDMS/article/view/244800

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Section

Original Article