Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteopenia of Prematurity of Very Low Birth Weight Infants at Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital

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Jutartip Koonsiripaiboon
Supapan Tantracheewathorn

Abstract

Background: The advanced neonatal care improved survival of preterm and very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. However, complications of prematurity increased especially osteopenia of prematurity which caused long-term effects to these infants.


Objective: To determine prevalence and risk factors of osteopenia of prematurity in VLBW infants.


Methods: Retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Vajira Hospital. Medical records and x-rays of infants, whose birth weight was less than 1,500 grams and admitted more than 8 weeks from January 2014 to May 2019, were reviewed.


Results: Eighty VLBW infants were enrolled. Prevalence of osteopenia of prematurity in VLBW infants was 12.5%. Factors associated with osteopenia of prematurity were long duration of nothing per oral, long duration to full enteral feeding, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), duration of total parenteral nutrition, duration of use medication (furosemide, aminophylline) and length of hospital stay. After using logistic regression analysis, only three factors including NPO time, duration to full enteral feeding and the presence of NEC were significant. The presence of NEC was the most related risk factor (OR 12.40, 95% CI 1.81-84.77). Infants with osteopenia received less energy, calcium and phosphorus than those without osteopenia.


Conclusions: The prevalence of osteopenia of prematurity in VLBW infants at Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital was 12.5%. Factors associated with osteopenia of prematurity were long duration of nothing per oral, long duration to full enteral feeding and presence of NEC.

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References

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