Prevalence and Factors Related to Metabolic Syndrome in Personnel of Somdejphrajaotaksinmaharaj Hospital

Main Article Content

Kanoknan Somnuk
Kulrut Saytichai
Kittipong Ounkeaw
Rungnapha Siriphonphaibool
Arnon Thongkonghan

Abstract

Objective: To study prevalence and factors related to metabolic syndrome in personnel of Somdejphrajaotaksinmaharaj Hospital


Method: This was a descriptive research. The sample was 805 personnel of Somdejphrajaotaksinmaharaj hospital who received annual health checks up in 2019. The data were collected from medical records and questionnaire which included general characteristics and personal behavioral factors. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regressions were used for identifying risk factors and presenting adjusted odds ratio (ORadj).


Results: The results showed that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 15.80% among Somdejphrajaotaksinmaharaj hospital personnel. The statistically significant factors related to the metabolic syndrome by using the univariate were the gender, age, disease, smoking, alcohol drinking and exercise frequency (p<0.05). Male were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 3.10 times (95% CI: 1.71-5.63) more than female. Over 45 years of age were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 2.35 times (95% CI: 1.27-4.33) more than lower than 45 years. Underlying diseases were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 5.65 times (95% CI: 3.05-10.45) more than absence of underlying diseases. Smoking were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 2.24 times (95% CI: 1.05-4.78) more than non-smoking. Alcohols drinking were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 1.93 times (95% CI: 1.11-3.37) more than non-alcohols drinking. Exercise frequency lower than 3 day were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 0.45 times (95% CI: 0.26-0.78) more than exercise frequency over 3 day. The factors related to the metabolic syndrome by using the multiple logistic regressions were gender, disease and exercise frequency (p<0.05). Male were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 0.39 times (95% CI: 0.19-0.95) more than female. Underlying diseases were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 0.20 times (95% CI: 0.10-0.39) more than absence of underlying diseases. Exercise frequency lower than 3 day were found to at risk of metabolic syndrome 1.34 times (95% CI: 0.70-2.55) more than exercise frequency over 3 day.


Conclusion: This research showed the prevalence and factors related to metabolic syndrome of the personnel of Somdejphrajaotaksinmaharaj Hospital. This finding can be useful to plan the prevention and the treatment program in the future.

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