Fluoride release from different powder liquid ratios of Fuji VII

Main Article Content

Woranun Prapansilp
Praphasri Rirattanapong
Rudee Surarit
Kadkao Vongsavan

Abstract

Objective: The quantity of fluoride ions released from glass-ionomer cements is of major importance in the prevention of dental caries in children. Fuji VII is a glass-ionomer that releases more fluoride ions than other fluoride releasing materials.  


Purposep: To evaluate the concentration of fluoride ions released from the Fuji VII with differing powder liquid (P/L) mixing ratios.


Methods: Eight cylindrical specimens from four groups with different P/L ratios were prepared and immersed independently in 10 mL of deionized water. The fluoride release was evaluated on days 1-7 using a fluoride ion specific electrode. Statistical analyses of the difference between fluoride concentrations were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparison test.


Results : The fluoride released by the glass ionomers (GIs) was found to be highest during the first 24 h and decreased significantly; lower levels were obtained on day 7. Fuji VII P/L ratio 4:4 and Fuji VII P/L ratio 3:4 showed similar patterns and quantity of fluoride release, which were significantly lower than Fuji VII P/L ratio 2:4 and Fuji VII P/L ratio 1:4.


Conclusions: Fuji VII P/L ratio 2:4 and Fuji VII P/L ratio 1:4 released more fluoride than Fuji VII P/L ratio 4:4 and Fuji VII P/L ratio 3:4.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Prapansilp W, Rirattanapong P, Surarit R, Vongsavan K. Fluoride release from different powder liquid ratios of Fuji VII. M Dent J [Internet]. 2020 Oct. 21 [cited 2024 Jun. 18];37(2):217-22. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/mdentjournal/article/view/246857
Section
Original articles

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