Relationship Between Parenting Styles and Academic Achievement in Mathayom 6 School Students

Main Article Content

Narisara Tiyapan

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to study was to determine the association between parenting style as perceived by adolescents and school performance in Mathayom 6 school students.


Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 268 Mathayom 6 students at Nawamintrachinutit Satriwitthaya Putthamonthon School. Information from students about perceived parenting style were collected by using parental bonding instrument (PBI). Grades of school performance were obtained from adolescents. This study controlled the IQ confounding factor by using The Raven’s progressive Matrices.


Results: Paternal and maternal optimal parenting style were found to be the most common. Data analysis, after controlled for IQ, showed significant correlation between maternal optimal style and higher school performance. There was on significant correlation between paternal parental style and school performance. Father with higher levels of education was significantly associated with higher grades. Parents not living together significantly associated with lower grades.


Conclusion: Maternal Optimal parenting styles had a significant influence on high school performance of adolescents. Parents not living together significantly associated with lower grades in adolescents. Therefore, the parents should encourage their closed relationship and mother should take the active role of optimal parenting style rearing. Future research should focus on investigating parenting styles and adolescents’ school performance in a longitudinal study as it would allow researcher to make stronger inferences of causality.

Article Details

How to Cite
Tiyapan, N. (2011). Relationship Between Parenting Styles and Academic Achievement in Mathayom 6 School Students. Ramathibodi Medical Journal, 34(4), 207-214. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ramajournal/article/view/137903
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Original Articles

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