A Study of Patients’ Knowledge in Self-Care Undergoing Neuraxial Block

Main Article Content

Pensiri Poomhirun
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4221-3982
Wanee Ongvisetpaiboon
Vanlapa Arnuntasupakul

Abstract

Abstract:This descriptive research aimed to 1) describe of patients’ knowledge in self-care undergoing neuraxial block 2) compare the patients’ knowledge in self-care between who had received and had not received previous knowledge and 3) compare the patients’ knowledge in self-care between receiving and not receiving knowledge from anesthetists. The sample included 200 patients, aged between 15-65 years scheduled for surgery under neuraxial block in a university hospital. The questionnaires on patients’ demographic data and knowledge of neuraxial block were used to collect data postoperative day 1 at ward. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney test.


Results revealed that the sample had good knowledge regarding the appropriate behavior after recovery from neuraxial block.The patients whom received previous knowledge had significantly higher score than those who didn’t received previous knowledge (p=.034). The patients receiving knowledge from anesthetists had significantly higher score than those counterparts (p=.015). The result suggested that nursing care should be provided at ward particularly knowledge and information from anesthetists providing before neuraxial block in order for patients to have a good care of themselves after neuraxial block.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Poomhirun P, Ongvisetpaiboon W, Arnuntasupakul V. A Study of Patients’ Knowledge in Self-Care Undergoing Neuraxial Block. Nurs Res Inno J [Internet]. 2018 Jul. 16 [cited 2024 Jul. 13];24(1):69-7. Available from: https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/RNJ/article/view/84996
Section
บทความวิจัย

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