Effect of Nurses’ Support on Preterm Infant Caring Among Mothers in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Authors

  • Suphichchayanun Phibool Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University
  • Jutamas Chotibang Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University
  • Malee Urharmnuay Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University

Keywords:

Nurses’ Support, Preterm Infant Caring, Mothers, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Abstract

Preterm infants are separated from their mothers after birth for treatment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Prolonged separation between mothers and infants removes the act of infant care from mothers and affects maternal-infant bonding. This quasi-experimental research aimed to compare preterm infant caring among mothers between the experimental and control groups. The samples consisted of mothers whose infants were born at post-conceptional age 31-36 weeks and admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital. Thirty-four samples were selected by purposive sampling and divided into an experimental group and a control group, with seventeen samples in each group. Both groups consisted of mothers of comparable age, level of education, labour type, and post-conceptional age of newborn infants, with similar medical equipment used for infant care. Research instruments included the Nursing Support Program for Mothers Caring Preterm Infant in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit developed based on the concept of social support (House, 1981). Data collection tools included a questionnaire regarding preterm infant care for mothers in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Its content validity index was at 1.0 and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was at .83. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, the Chi-Squared Test, the Mann-Whitney U Test, and the Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Test. Results of this study revealed that: 1. The mean score for preterm infant care was significantly higher for the experimental group, after having received nurses’ support, than before received. 2. The mean score for preterm infant care was significantly higher for the experimental group, after having received nurses’ support, than that of the control group. The study results provide guidance for pediatric nurse support mothers for caring preterm infant in neonatal intensive care unit. which encourage increased amount of infant care by mothers, maternal-infant interaction, and provide adequate preparation for proper infant care at home.

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Published

2021-12-20