The Role of Visual Pedagogies in Enhancing Corrporation to Professional Prophylaxis Fluoride of Children with Mild Autism at Yuwaprasart Waithayopathum Hospital

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Paweelada Khoomyat
Pareyaasiri Witoonchart

Abstract

This study was amied to evaluate the role of visual pedagogies on enhancing cooperation in simple dental procedures as professional prophylaxis fluoride (PPF) of children with autism. Twenty children with mild autism, aged range 6-10 years old; in the 4th ward of Yuwaprasert Waithayopathum Hospital who never had dental treatment were oral examined. Tell-Show-Do (TSD) technique was used to manage their behavior. The children were randomly divided into 2 groups: visual pedagogy (VP) and control (C) group. The PPF procedures will be performed in next 7 days appointment for the C group and only TSD technique were used. For the VP group, 2 days before the next appointment, each child will be prepared for PPF procedure by VP training, which composed of equipments and steps in PPF procedures for once a day and the training time use was recorded. PPF procedures was schedules in the next day, that the dentist used TSD technique and the same VP album to communicate with the VP group. Every visit each childs behavior was recorded in the VDO tape. The tape was replayed to two independent observers for rating the child cooperation according to Melamed’s Behavior Profile Rating Scale. The VP group had increased positive behavior 90% while the C group had 10%. The VP group was significantly more positive behavior than the C group (P > 0.05). The VP decreased timimg in the second visit for training VP from the first time.


 

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How to Cite
Khoomyat, P., & Witoonchart, P. (2015). The Role of Visual Pedagogies in Enhancing Corrporation to Professional Prophylaxis Fluoride of Children with Mild Autism at Yuwaprasart Waithayopathum Hospital. Ramathibodi Medical Journal, 38(2), 142-153. Retrieved from https://he02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/ramajournal/article/view/102001
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Original Articles

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